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SpaceX returns to the launch pad for a second Starlink mission

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A rocket is being constructed.

Enlarge / Here is one half of the payload fairing that SpaceX recovered after a Falcon Heavy launch in April. (credit: Elon Musk)

Nearly three months have passed since SpaceX flew a rocket—the company last launched the AMOS-17 satellite on August 6 aboard a Falcon 9 rocket.

But now the company is returning to the launch pad to send its second batch of Starlink Internet satellites into low Earth orbit. On Tuesday, SpaceX completed a static test firing of the Falcon 9 rocket's first stage that is presently scheduled to launch on November 11 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Beyond the primary mission, this flight is going for two rocket reuse milestones.

This will be the first time that SpaceX has attempted to fly the same Falcon 9 first stage four times. This particular stage flew on July 25 (Iridium 7 mission) and October 8 (SAOCOM 1-A) in 2018 as well as February 22 (Nusantara Satu and Beresheet spacecraft) this year.

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Software Updates

4 Comments and 13 Shares
Everything is a cloud application; the ping times just vary a lot.
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popular
14 days ago
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4 public comments
mvoelske
13 days ago
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Funny, while looking at this very comic I noticed that a very recent update to Chrome (on Android) ruined the title-text feature. Now how do I roll this fucker back?
mvoelske
9 days ago
And FYI: you can go to chrome://flags and disable "revamped context menu" to see the full title text again
aakashm
14 days ago
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I'm sure Stallman would have something to say about this
cbenard
14 days ago
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ShareX > 12.0.0 removing the ability to use Greenshot to edit. Stuck on 12.0.0 forever now.
Plano, Texas
alt_text_bot
14 days ago
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Everything is a cloud application; the ping times just vary a lot.
hairfarmerrich
14 days ago
Sigh... Outlook 2010, how I miss your true dark mode, folding calendar, drag-drop support and smart search folders. In corporate culture, 'unwilling to lose' is not the same as 'allowed to keep'.
WorldMaker
13 days ago
If it helps, true Dark Mode came back to Office in 2018/2019 (depending 365 or standalone).

NordVPN users’ passwords exposed in mass credential-stuffing attacks

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Screenshot from gameshow Password.

(credit: ABC Photo Archives / Getty Images)

As many as 2,000 users of NordVPN, the virtual private network service that recently disclosed a server hack that leaked crypto keys, have fallen victim to credential-stuffing attacks that allow unauthorized access to their accounts.

In recent weeks, credentials for NordVPN users have circulated on Pastebin and other online forums. They contain the email addresses, plain-text passwords, and expiration dates associated with NordVPN user accounts.

I received a list of 753 credentials on Thursday and polled a small sample of users. The passwords listed for all but one were still in use. The one user who had changed their password did so after receiving an unrequested password reset email. It would appear someone who gained unauthorized access was trying to take over the account. Several other people said their accounts had been accessed by unauthorized people.

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Google buys Fitbit for $2.1 billion

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It's official: Google is buying Fitbit. The company announced the move in a blog post this morning, and reports say the deal is worth $2.1 billion.

Google's SVP of hardware, Rick Osterloh, posted an announcement of the acquisition on Google's blog, saying the move was "an opportunity to invest even more in Wear OS as well as introduce Made by Google wearable devices into the market."

This is the second time this year Google has made an acquisition aimed at bolstering Wear OS, having previously purchased an unknown technology from Fossil Group for $40 million.

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Google will replace Home devices bricked due to latest firmware update

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Photography by Vjeran Pavic / The Verge

If your Google Home or Google Home Mini has recently stopped working, good news: Google will likely replace it.

This year, there have been a growing number of reports of bricked Homes and Home Minis on Google’s support forums (via 9to5Google) and on Reddit (via Android Police), and the volume of reports has picked up since mid-September. It’s wasn’t clear what the issue was, and Google finally acknowledged that there was a problem in September.

It seems Google’s had a breakthrough, issuing a statement to 9to5Google today saying it’s found a fix for the issue, which was caused by an error in an automatic firmware update. Google says the fix will roll out to working devices soon to (hopefully) prevent them from bricking at any point in the future. The company will also replace affected Google Homes and Home Minis, even if they’re out of warranty.

“We are aware that a small number of Google Home and Google Home Mini devices are affected by an issue that causes the device to stop working. We have a fix that will prevent the issue from happening and will be rolling it out soon. We are replacing affected devices,” the statement reads.

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Unpatched Linux flaw may let attackers crash or compromise nearby devices

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Wi-FI logo.

Enlarge (credit: Wi-Fi Alliance)

A potentially serious vulnerability in Linux may make it possible for nearby devices to use Wi-Fi signals to crash or fully compromise vulnerable machines, a security researcher said.

The flaw is located in the RTLWIFI driver, which is used to support Realtek Wi-Fi cards in Linux devices. The vulnerability triggers a buffer overflow in the Linux kernel when a machine with a Realtek Wi-Fi card is within radio range of a malicious device. At a minimum, exploits would allow denial-of-service attacks and possibly could allow a hacker to gain complete control of the computer. The flaw dates back to version 3.12 of the Linux kernel released in 2013.

"The bug is serious," Nico Waisman, who is a principal security engineer at Github, told Ars. "It's a vulnerability that triggers an overflow remotely through Wi-Fi on the Linux kernel, as long as you're using the Realtek (RTLWIFI) driver."

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